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Watching my children and students work with manipulatives, I can see how hands-on experiences with math concepts help build a solid foundation for future learning. Often, teachers and students struggle with the transition from concrete manipulatives to a representation of the concept. Web- or app-based “virtual” manipulatives help to make this transition easier, although many teachers struggle to find a place for these tools in the classroom. Hands-on manipulatives are an excellent tool on their own, and they are even more powerful when coupled with virtual manipulatives. To support the use of these virtual tools, Didax has developed more than a dozen free virtual resources, available on our website. If you need some help getting started, read on for some ideas!

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Mathematics educators have recently highlighted the need for “low floor, high ceiling” tasks that lead students into rich areas of inquiry. The “Four 4’s” problem is a fairly well-known example cited by Jo Boaler and others, but such challenges are hard to develop. It is often difficult to find an exercise, game, or a puzzle that is instantly accessible at a basic level, yet also leads to the exploration of higher-order thinking and deeper mathematical insights. The PEMDice game is designed to scratch this itch. Very simple in concept and, when played in its elementary form, it is ultimately as complex and as challenging as anyone cares to make it.Read More
Every spring, millions of people turn their attention to what is, mathematically speaking, a tree diagram. Some think about it only when their favorite team is playing, while others are completely immersed in the annual College Basketball tradition known as “March Madness.” This frenzied tournament provides multiple opportunities to engage students in math, although we sometimes focus so narrowly on probability and statistics that students miss out on other opportunities to learn. In the spirit of the season, we’d like to share some ideas for teachers of all levels to bring March Mathness to the classroom. You can use the link below to access the activity sheets to use in your classroom. A printable tournament bracket is available here.Read More

Every year around this time, my family is getting ready for back-to-school night. Now that I have children in high school, junior high, and elementary school, it’s always fun to see how this event is handled at the different levels. When I was teaching high school, we were very structured, with parents moving from class to class as though on a regular schedule; I think we had each group for ten minutes, just long enough to quickly review the syllabus and policies and send them off to the next class. Regardless of the structure of back-to-school night at your school, there are a few things you can do to make the evening more engaging for students and their parents. A good place to start is having some manipulatives you’ll be using during the year out for parents to handle. Things like Unifix Cubes, Pattern Blocks, Ten-Frame Floor Mats and Fraction Tiles are always good choices.

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